TfL warns of 'severe disruption' on June 6 due to planned strike, advising that people avoid public transport

Mayor of London announces fare rise on TfL network

The strike has been organised due to proposals put forward by TfL that the RMT says will lead to hundreds of job losses - Credit: Transport for London

Transport for London (TfL) is advising against using public transport tomorrow (June 6) unless necessary, due to planned tube strikes across the capital. 

The strike has been organised by the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) due to threats of hundreds of job losses on the network, something TfL disputes. 

The service said it anticipates severe disruption across the network from the start of Monday through to 8am on Tuesday. 

Buses however will continue to run as normal, as will services including the DLR, London Overground and trams, though they are expected to be particularly busy. 

Andy Lord, TfL’s chief operating officer, said: “While our focus is always on helping everyone travel around London whenever they want, the expected impact of the RMT’s action means we have to advise people to only travel tomorrow if necessary, as many stations may be closed.  

“Alternatives to the tube, including the bus and rail networks, are likely to be much busier than usual and we expect the severe disruption caused by this strike to continue into the morning of Tuesday, June 7.” 

TfL is working to reduce its costs due to a requirement from the government to be financially sustainable by April 2023. 

Most Read

As part of this, it is looking to not recruit into around 500 to 600 posts as they become vacant, including 250 currently unfilled tube station posts. 

In announcing the news of the strike in May, RMT general secretary Mick Lynch said: "TfL is trying to bulldoze through 600 job losses on London Underground and our members are not prepared to accept that. 

"Station staff play a crucial role in serving the travelling public and were heroes during the 7/7 terrorist attacks. 

"Instead of seeking to cut jobs, TfL and mayor Sadiq Khan need to put further pressure on the government to secure increased funding for the network so we can have a properly staffed, modern 21st-century tube." 

On the ongoing dispute, Mr Lord said: “No changes have been proposed to pensions and nobody has or will lose their job as a result of the proposals we have set out. 

“My message to the RMT is this – it’s not too late to call off tomorrow’s strike action. Working with us to find a resolution is the best course of action, avoiding the disruption this strike will cause to Londoners and the economy.”