Record-breaker Andy Green inspires Newham pupils with science talk

Andy Green with NCS pupils, including Raja Ali (second from right)

Andy Green with NCS pupils, including Raja Ali (second from right) - Credit: Archant

If you want to drive a car at 1,000 miles per hour, you’ve got to start by studying maths.

Andy Green with the Thrust SSC, in which he broke the land speed record in 1997 by driving at 760.34

Andy Green with the Thrust SSC, in which he broke the land speed record in 1997 by driving at 760.343 miles per hour - Credit: Archant

So said Andy Green, holder of the world land speed record since 1997 (when he rocketed through the Nevada desert at 760mph), as he promoted the power of engineering at Newham Collegiate Sixth Form.

He was visiting the East Ham school, in Barking Road, for British Science Week – but left feeling highly impressed by the borough’s scholars.

“I’m hugely confident about future generations,” said the RAF wing commander, who is working towards beating his own record. “The questions these students have asked are as good as any I’ve ever heard.”

NCS is one of the first schools to invite Andy to speak, and he was very happy to discuss the the advantages of science.

Bloodhound SSC, the car Andy hopes to break his own record with

Bloodhound SSC, the car Andy hopes to break his own record with - Credit: Archant


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“These young people are studying the very world they will be building,” he said.

“Maths has been useful to me in every area of my life and it has helped me get the best job in the world.

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“Britain’s world class in innovation and it’s because of schools like this finding and teaching the next generation.”

The pilot, who said he was very proud to have flown missions in defence of UK air space, also mentioned Britain’s F1 dominance – claiming the only thing German about Mercedes’ car was its name.

His persuasive power won praise from student Raja Ali, 17, whose teachers consider him a “maths genius”.

“He was so knowledgeable,” said Raja. “I really liked his style. I’m set on maths, but he made me consider engineering.”

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