Search

‘Rare’ black-chested eagle films Newham in developer’s sales pitch

PUBLISHED: 09:00 20 September 2018

A rare black-chested buzzard eagle with a camera strapped to its back has given a bird’s eye view of the changing face of Newham. Pic: LONDON MEDIA

A rare black-chested buzzard eagle with a camera strapped to its back has given a bird’s eye view of the changing face of Newham. Pic: LONDON MEDIA

Archant

A rare eagle with a camera strapped to its back has recorded a bird’s eye view of the borough for a sales pitch.

It took three days to shoot the film. Pic: LONDON MEDIAIt took three days to shoot the film. Pic: LONDON MEDIA

The black-chested buzzard eagle surveyed the changing urban landscape just south of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

The footage was created by developer Vastint UK to showcase its nearby 26 acre Sugar House Island development.

The company’s UK boss, Andrew Cobden, said: “Most schemes use drones to film this sort of thing but we thought this would be a more interesting way to see the area from the skies – a genuine bird’s eye view.”

The camera captured the City of London, Canary Wharf and Docklands as well as waterways and canals leading to the River Thames.

The eagle was used instead of a drone to film the area for a developer's sales pitch. Pic: LONDON MEDIAThe eagle was used instead of a drone to film the area for a developer's sales pitch. Pic: LONDON MEDIA

The firm predicts its regeneration project will bring 2,500 jobs to the borough along with offices and homes.

It chose to commission the two minute long film as an eye-catching sales pitch to show off the area.

Scottish company Elite Falconry used two eagles with two metre wingspans to make the film.

The birds were used to very different terrain spending most of their lives flying in the Scottish Highlands but they soon got used to Newham.

The developer's UK boss Andrew Cobden with Oasis. Pic: LONDON MEDIAThe developer's UK boss Andrew Cobden with Oasis. Pic: LONDON MEDIA

Elite Falconry’s Roxanne Peggie said: “This is obviously a very different environment to the one they’re used to but they were really relaxed and adapted quickly. We captured some really engaging footage.”

The footage in the film comes from bird of prey, Oasis. A Steppe eagle was used in practice flights.

The pair were fitted with gadgets to track their movements so they didn’t get lost.

It took Vastint, a film crew and Elite Falconry three days to shoot the film.

The birds were at one point harassed by some territorial East End crows but they soon gave up when they saw the size of their Scottish visitors.

Andrew Cobden added: “The birds are impressive creatures and it was a privilege to work with them and the team to document what we’re doing here. This is a unique site and we’re thrilled to be able to show it off in this unusual way.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Newham Recorder. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Newham Recorder