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Virtual reality programme allows cyclists to see how they look from the driving seat of a lorry

PUBLISHED: 07:58 29 August 2018 | UPDATED: 07:58 29 August 2018

Police and TfL have launched a 360 degree film of the Met’s Exchanging Places programme, designed to reduce road danger.

Police and TfL have launched a 360 degree film of the Met’s Exchanging Places programme, designed to reduce road danger.

Archant

Cyclists are being asked to put themselves in the driving seat of a lorry to prevent road accidents.

The commonest accidents causing serious injury to cyclists in London involve lorries.The commonest accidents causing serious injury to cyclists in London involve lorries.

There were 79 cyclist casualties in Newham in 2016, a decrease of 23 per cent on the year before, the latest figures from Transport for London (TfL) reveal.

There were 10 cyclists killed or seriously injured in 2016, according to analysis from pressure group Travel Independent.

In February last year a rider died following a collision with a lorry at the junction of Knights Road and North Woolwich Road, Silvertown.

The commonest cause of death and serious injury to cyclists involves collisions with heavy good vehicles (HGVs), the Met and TfL reported.

Insp Tony Mannakee, the Met’s Road Danger Reduction manager with Supt Robert Revill.Insp Tony Mannakee, the Met’s Road Danger Reduction manager with Supt Robert Revill.

More than 70pc of cyclist deaths involved lorries over the last three years despite HGVs making up only four per cent of miles driven in the capital.

London mayor Sadiq Khan, TfL and the police have vowed to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on the capital’s roads.

The Met’s roads and transport policing command along with TfL hope a virtual reality headset giving cyclists a 360 degree view from a lorry’s cab, launched last week, will help riders better understand what drivers can and can’t see.

Supt Robert Revill said: “It’s absolutely amazing. I’m really pleased with it. We’re aiming to reduce road deaths to zero by 2041.

The Met and TfL want to take the programme to schools, youth clubs, libraries and care homes across east London.The Met and TfL want to take the programme to schools, youth clubs, libraries and care homes across east London.

“Anything we can do to protect cyclists and make roads safer must be a help.”

The brains behind the measure want to take it into schools, youth clubs and care homes to spread awareness of the risks lorries pose to cyclists and vulnerable pedestrians.

“It’s more practical because we can’t take a lorry along,” Supt Revill explained.

Simon Munk from the London Cycling Campaign said: “In east London, we’re seeing some major changes moving forward for a few key junctions such as Charlie Brown’s Roundabout and the Stratford gyratory.

Cyclist Brian Ruggles (centre) welcomed the measure but said a similar scheme was needed for HGV drivers.Cyclist Brian Ruggles (centre) welcomed the measure but said a similar scheme was needed for HGV drivers.

“But we know there are far too many dangerous junctions left that feature no plans and have no funding.

“We need far more rapid action on dangerous junctions, more 20mph zones, more cycle tracks on main roads, more low traffic neighbourhoods, more willingness to back fine words with real action.”

The programme – called Exchanging Places – was filmed in and around an HGV.

It shows a cyclist passing and the driver’s restricted view from the cab.

Police and TfL launched the technology as part of Vision Zero designed to eliminate accidents on the capital's transport network by 2041.Police and TfL launched the technology as part of Vision Zero designed to eliminate accidents on the capital's transport network by 2041.

People wearing the headset get to see all this from the cyclist’s and driver’s points of view.

Hitchin Nomads cyclicng club member Brian Ruggles – who had a go – said: “It was really good.

“You get a better idea of what the lorry driver can see of you.

“But the lessons need to be for both sides – cyclists and drivers.”

Inspector Tony Mannakee, the Met’s road danger reduction manager, said the headsets would allow the police to reach a wider audience.

“We’re working very hard to reduce fatal and serious collisions. We want to get across the message that everybody’s got a shared responsibility on the roads.

“Everybody needs to respect each other and understand what it’s like to be a cyclist and what it’s like to be in the cab of an HGV.”

TfL plans to bring in a star rating for HGVs based on how well a driver can see from a cab.

Cyclist Brian Ruggles (centre) welcomed the measure but said a similar scheme was needed for HGV drivers.Cyclist Brian Ruggles (centre) welcomed the measure but said a similar scheme was needed for HGV drivers.

Only vehicles rated three stars or more or those with enhanced safety will be allowed on the capital’s roads from 2024.

Joshua Harris of road safety charity Brake welcomed the approach saying: “All road deaths are preventable and tragic.

“HGVs are involved in half of all cycling deaths in London so it is vitally important that steps are taken.”

And TfL is renewing calls for volunteers to help police monitor vehicle speeds on the borough’s roads.

Insp Tony Mannakee, the Met’s Road Danger Reduction manager with Supt Robert Revill.Insp Tony Mannakee, the Met’s Road Danger Reduction manager with Supt Robert Revill.

Since it began in August 2015 44 joint speed detecting sessions have caught 1,029 speeding vehicles in Newham.

To sign up email communityroadwatch@metpolice.uk

To suggest a place for the virtual technology programme email exchang
ingplaces@metpolice.uk

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