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Mourners flock to say final farewell to Jordan Bari

PUBLISHED: 22:16 22 November 2016 | UPDATED: 09:24 23 November 2016

Family and friends attending the funeral of Jordan Bari

Family and friends attending the funeral of Jordan Bari

Archant

Around 100 mourners attended the funeral of shooting victim Jordan Bari today at East London Crematorium in Plaistow.

Family and friends attending the funeral of Jordan BariFamily and friends attending the funeral of Jordan Bari

Several people wore “RIP Jordan” t-shirts, and the chapel was so full that many had to stand outside.

The service, led by Reverend Annie McTighe, who lived near Jordan’s family and remembered him as a “thoughtful and hard-working” young man, began with a recording of a piece of music by Jordan’s sister, Layla, called River Flow In You.

As people filed into the chapel, they were handed post-it notes and coloured pens to write down happy memories of Jordan, which were then used to decorate his coffin.

Family and friends attending the funeral of Jordan BariFamily and friends attending the funeral of Jordan Bari

Layla, 17, was tearful as she recited a poem she wrote in his honour called Flame in honour of her brother.

“You were a flame, illuminating the darkest corner of the room [...] but just like a flame you were only temporary.”

His 11-year-old brother stood before the congregation wearing a black suit and said: “You are always in my heart and we will never forget you”.

Pallbearers included members of London Black Belt Academy, where Jordan, from East Village, had trained since he was seven years old.

Simon Drake read a eulogy by John Tomlin, Jordan’s karate instructor, and his fellow martial artists performed a traditional bow to Jordan’s coffin.

Mother Lisa said: “I remember the day Jordan was born - how scared I was for this tiny baby.”

“You were my firstborn, my world.”

She said as he grew he became a cheeky child, who loved to playfight with her - although she always won with her secret weapon: tickling him.

The service ended with a bittersweet recording of Jordan in happier times, beatboxing to the whoops of a crowd when he was 18.


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