London 2012: Olympic Torch relay day five pictures - Zara Phillips and Didier Drogba

The Olympic Flame was carried by royal hands on day five of the Torch relay.

The Queen’s granddaughter Zara Phillips was the last torchbearer on the 140.5 mile leg between Bristol and Cheltenham.

She carried the Olympic Torch into Cheltenham Racecourse on her horse ToyTown where she lit the cauldron ahead of a celebration to welcome the Flame.

Zara Phillips, whose mother The Princess Royal collected the Flame in Greece last week, has won world and European titles in equestrian.

The Flame was also carried by footballers Didier Drogba, who has just announced he is leaving Chelsea, and Josh McEachran.


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On day five of the Torch relay the Flame travelled through places including Royal Wootton Bassett, Swindon and Stroud before reaching Cheltenham, where it was kept overnight.

Other torchbearers included George Stockton from Gloucestershire. The 18-year-old is profoundly deaf yet has always worked hard against the odds to compete alongside his hearing peers. He was selected to play for the County of Dorset under 16’s Football Team when he was 15 and has completed his Level 2 FA Coaching qualification alongside studying for a Sports Coaching Diploma.

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Chloe Walker, 13, has cerebral palsy and makes the most of every experience she has. She has taken part in Playground2Podium programme and has participated in activities at a district and county level.

Kelly Beamish, 23, from Cheltenham, dedicates her spare time to sending care packages to British forces fighting abroad as well as campaigning against the wrongful convictions of innocent prisoners. In the future she aims to continue helping those in need, and hopes to set up a non profit organisation helping soldiers readjust to civilian life.

Terence Parker, 73, from Cheltenham, has dedicated 13 years to giving disabled adults and children in Gloucestershire the opportunity to play tennis.

These disabilities range between mild learning difficulties including autism and Asperger’s Syndrome, to severe mental and physical problems, and in many cases both. He currently teaches tennis to children at four special schools in Gloucestershire on a weekly basis.

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