London 2012: Games organisers draw up hosepipe ban plans

Olympic organisers are to review their plans to ensure there is enough water to go round during the Games after yesterday’s confirmation that a hosepipe ban will be imposed before Easter.

Locog already had arrangements in place to recycle almost half of all water used at Olympic Park venues to take the pressure away from the water system in Stratford.

Under the ban, any householder caught flouting the restrictions, by using a hose or garden sprinkler, will face prosecution and a hefty fine.

And Thames Water have admitted they will have to apply for an extended ban - which will hit businesses - if the dry spell continues.

The Old Ford treatment plant, built on the Olympic Park, will recycle water to be used for non-drinking purposes during the Games, like cleaning the facilities and maintaining toilets.


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A Locog spokesman said: “We are discussing with the Department for Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the utility companies plans to ensure that there are adequate supplies of water needed for Games operations whilst also minimising non-essential water use.

“We will be reviewing our contingency plans to ensure all eventualities are covered.

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“Forty per cent of the water expected to be used during the Games will come from recycled supplies.”

The Athletes’ Village will contain 2,818 apartments and landscaped gardens while the park’s outdoor arenas will be used by tens of thousands of visitors.

Thames Water said the London and south east region has suffered one of the driest two-year periods on record. Since March 2010, the region has had 35cm less rain than normal.

Chief executive Martin Baggs said: “We know these restrictions will be unpopular, but they will save a lot of water.

“A garden sprinkler uses as much water in an hour as a family of four uses in a day, and when water is in short supply the needs of families must come first.

“With no way of knowing how long it will be before significant rainfall comes, we must plan for the worst while hoping for the best.”

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