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Medals of three brothers killed in WWI are sold at auction

PUBLISHED: 11:09 29 November 2013 | UPDATED: 11:09 29 November 2013

Jeremy Cheek, specialist at auction house Morton and Eden displays: (left to right) three 1914 to 1915 Star Medals, three War Medals and three Victory Medals.

Jeremy Cheek, specialist at auction house Morton and Eden displays: (left to right) three 1914 to 1915 Star Medals, three War Medals and three Victory Medals.

Archant

Medals belonging to three brothers killed in the First World War were sold at auction for £900.

The 1914-15 Star, War and Victory medals were expected to realise between £600-£800 at the auction held at Sotheby’s and conducted by specialists Morton and Eden.

Corporals Percy and Leonard and Private Walter Turner were all killed in action in some of the bloodiest fighting of the 1914-18 conflict, which left 16 million dead and 20 million wounded.

The Turner family lived on Abbey Road, Stratford during the Great War and previously lived at Clifford Road, West Ham.

Percy died in action on “W” Beach, Cape Helles, on the first day of the Gallipoli landings, Turkey, on April 25, 1915.

The action was later to become known as the “Lancashire Landing”, after six VCs were famously awarded to members of the Lancashire Fusiliers.

Aged 25, Percy was serving with the Essex Regiment and is commemorated on the Helles Commonwealth War Graves Memorial.

Leonard, 20, also died at Gallipoli, on October 28. He was serving with the Norfolk Regiment.

He is interred at the 7th Field Ambulance Cemetery.

Walter was killed near Ypres on October 5, 1917, aged 24. He was serving with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and his medals are accompanied by an original condolence slip. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Speaking before the sale, auctioneer specialist Paul Wood, said: “Given the massive number of soldiers killed or missing during what was supposed to be the war to end all wars, it was a sad fact that a number of families lost fathers, sons and brothers in the conflict.

“It is unusual, however, for the Great War medals of three brothers who were all casualties to come to auction together.”

*See next Wednesday’s Newham Recorder for more.


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