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A Sikh explains what Remembrance Sunday means to him

PUBLISHED: 12:58 06 November 2013 | UPDATED: 12:58 06 November 2013

Fauja Singh and Harmander Singh displaying medals they have been awarded for taking part in  a recent marathon

Fauja Singh and Harmander Singh displaying medals they have been awarded for taking part in a recent marathon

Archant

Harmander Singh is a practising Sikh who is most well known as the trainer for the 102-year-old marathon runner Fauja Singh.

Harmander, who lives in Ilford and is club secretary of Sikhs in the City, explains the impact his faith has on Remembrance Sunday

He said: “When I wake up on Sunday morning I will slip into my usual routine which as a Sikh includes a prayer called Ardaas the equivalent of the Christian Lord’s Prayer. In the Ardaas, Sikhs include the names of their Gurus, the five beloved ones, the four sons of the tenth Guru, the forty forgiven, and the countless martyrs who made the ultimate sacrifice to defend the vulnerable, and defeat the oppressors throughout history.

“While I dutifully make breakfast my thoughts will return to the Ardaas. I will be reminded of the steadfastness of those who had given their lives, not only to allow me to be identified as a Sikh, but the need to defend all humanity from threat and oppression.

“My thoughts will turn to our collective continued duty not to forget the fallen on Remembrance Sunday. We’ll all do this in our own ways of course. I’ll come home early from my weekly training run and dedicate the rest of the morning to watching the events in Whitehall on TV, ending with the poignant ceremony around the Cenotaph. It will serve the purpose of reminding me of the futility of war when so many lose their lives balanced with the need to defend freedoms and princples so precious to all of us.”


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