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Doctor’s surgery in Custom House placed in special measures by health watchdog

PUBLISHED: 11:02 05 October 2018 | UPDATED: 11:08 05 October 2018

Dr Tun Lwin's surgery in Prince Regent Lane, Custom House, has been placed in special measures after a CQC inspection rated it inadequate overall. Picture: Google

Dr Tun Lwin's surgery in Prince Regent Lane, Custom House, has been placed in special measures after a CQC inspection rated it inadequate overall. Picture: Google

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A doctor’s surgery in Custom House has been placed in special measures.

A doctor’s surgery in Custom House has been placed in special measures after inspectors found staff doing clinical work had not undergone proper checks when they were hired.

Dr Tun Lwin’s practice in Prince Regent Lane, also failed to meet cervical screening and childhood immunisation targets, and there were no plans in place to meet them.

In a damning reported released today by Care Quality Commission (CQC), other concerns raised includes follow ups for patients weren’t done quickly enough or sometimes not at all, and the surgery has adequate systems in place to respond to emergencies.

The CQC inspection, which was carried out in August, also discovered systems to protect patients from infection weren’t working effectively, complaints weren’t dealt with using the proper procedures and information on how to make complaints were hard for patients to find.

At its last inspection in August 2017, the practice was rated requires improvement, with three categories rated good.

However this time only one category – being caring – was given a good rating.

When the surgery was first inspected in 2016, issues were raised around the fire safety systems, which were raised again during an inspection in last year.

The practice has been instructed to make sure the correct number of staff are always on duty, and to ensure treatment is provided in a safe way.

Systems must be put in place to improve the governance of the surgery and care must only be provided with the relevant person’s consent.

It also has also been advised to improve training and the complaints procedure.

However the report did praise staff saying they were kind and compassionate, and patients were always able to access care when they needed it.

Ursula Gallagher, deputy chief inspector professor from the primary medical service, said: “People who use the service should be reassured that it will be kept under review and if needed could be escalated to urgent enforcement action.”

The surgery has been given two months to improve before another inspection, and could be closed within six months if it doesn’t meet standards.

A spokesman for the surgery said: “We are very disappointed to receive this rating from the CQC. We are fully committed to addressing the issues raised and are working hard to make the required improvements to ensure that our patients receive the level and quality of care that they deserve.”

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