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Cancer charity says most men survive testicular cancer

PUBLISHED: 13:08 11 August 2013

Scientists for Cancer Research UK carry out vital research  Picture: Nick Daly

Scientists for Cancer Research UK carry out vital research Picture: Nick Daly

studio@nickdaly.co.uk

Focus: Men’s Cancer: Figures released by a cancer charity have revealed that thirty per cent more men have survived testicular cancer in the last 40 years.

Figures released by a cancer charity have revealed that thirty per cent more men have survived testicular cancer in the last 40 years and nearly all men now beat the disease.

The statistics from Cancer Research UK now form part of the new “Beat Cancer Sooner” campaign which aims to highlight the pivotal role of research in the fight against cancer and encourage people to support the charity.

The figures show that more than 96 per cent of men now survive testicular cancer in the UK, compared with less than 70 per cent in the 1970s. These improvements are largely thanks to the drug cisplatin, which Cancer Research UK helped to develop.

In London, around 230 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer every year which is the most common form of the disease in men aged 15-49.

Dr Harpal Kumar, Cancer Research UK’s chief executive, said: “A clear success story in cancer research has been the drug cisplatin, which our scientists helped to develop. This is helping almost all men with testicular cancer to beat the disease and is a shining example of what we can achieve through dedicated research.

“For some types of cancer, the word ‘cure’ is almost a reality – 96 per cent of men with testicular cancer are now cured. But it’s important we recognise the four per cent who aren’t surviving the disease, as well as the fact that we still need treatments to be kinder to patients in the future. It’s only by doing more research that we can bring forward the day when we are able to beat all types of cancer.”

Martin Ledwick, head information nurse at Cancer Research UK, said: “The most common symptom of testicular cancer is a lump or swelling in one of the testicles. Although most lumps in the testicle won’t turn out to be cancer, it’s important you get symptoms checked out as early as possible as this gives the best chance of cure.

“Get used to how your testicles look and feel normally and if you notice a lump, swelling or persistent discomfort then go and see your GP. Cancer Research UK has a leaflet about what to look out for, which you can download from the website. You can also call the charity’s information nurses on freephone 0808 800 4040 if you have any questions.”

Around 5 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer in Newham every year.

Around 10 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer in Tower Hamlets every year, which is similar to the UK average.


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