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Former Queen's Market butcher is starring in ITV's World of Sport Wrestling

PUBLISHED: 16:10 01 August 2018 | UPDATED: 16:10 01 August 2018

Grado v Sha Samuels and Johnny Moss in the one-off New Year's Eve episode in 2017. Picture: ITV/Danielle Baguley

Grado v Sha Samuels and Johnny Moss in the one-off New Year's Eve episode in 2017. Picture: ITV/Danielle Baguley

ITV/ Danielle Baguley

A former butcher at Queen's Market is donning spandex and a mask to perform to millions of people on Saturdays.

Sha Samuels throwing Joe Coffey over the ropes during the World of Sport Wrestling one-off last year. Picture: ITV/Danielle BaguleySha Samuels throwing Joe Coffey over the ropes during the World of Sport Wrestling one-off last year. Picture: ITV/Danielle Baguley

Shaahen Hosseinpour, who goes by the stage name Sha Samuels, is taking part in ITV’s World of Sport Wrestling, which has been brought back to the channel after 30 years.

More than a million viewers are tuning in to watch Shaaheen, along with 27 others, wrestle, grapple and extravagantly pull each other to the floor.

“There was a lot of pain,” the 33-year-old said.

“Everyone thinks it’s fake and it’s not. You come out with lots of bumps and bruises.”

Sha Samuels, a former Queen's Road butcher. Picture: ITV/Danielle BaguleySha Samuels, a former Queen's Road butcher. Picture: ITV/Danielle Baguley

Sha also appeared on ITV last year, when he performed in a one-off WOS Wrestling on New Year’s Eve.

It’s since been brought back for 10 episodes, with four matches per episode.

Sha said: “The producers approached me and I had an interview like you would for any other job.

“It was good because a lot of the other wrestlers are my mates – I’ve known them for years.”

Sha began wrestling 15 years ago, when he balanced matches with working in his dad’s butchers in Queen’s Market. About two years ago, he quit the shop and took his fighting full-time.

“When I started, I was working two jobs and wasn’t getting paid much,” he said.

“I think my family were pleased when I was able to go full-time because they were happy I could make money elsewhere.

“I do miss it though, it was a lot of fun.”

Sha’s love of wrestling began when he was four. When he was 17, a friend invited him along to train with him.

“My family laughed when I said I wanted to be a wrestler,” Sha said.

“They thought it was stupid and they told me to concentrate on studying. Thank God I listened to myself.”

The dad-of-two said the massive audience figures serve as a reminder of how far he’s come since his time at the market.

“There were audiences of about four people when I began wrestling,” he said.

“I had to go through a lot of pain for hardly any money.

“But now my kids have watched me on TV, and they were glued to the screen.”

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