Search

How remote learning technology is minimising coronavirus disruption for sixth form students

PUBLISHED: 10:00 13 April 2020

NewVIc teachers are able to provide lessons and support to students through the use of online learning tools. Picture: NewVIc

NewVIc teachers are able to provide lessons and support to students through the use of online learning tools. Picture: NewVIc

Archant

Pioneering use of online learning technology is ensuring social distancing measures are causing minimal disruption for Newham Sixth Form College (NewVIc).

As education providers transition to online programmes and resources to reach remote learners amid the coronavirus pandemic, NewVIc staff and students have benefited from a smooth uptake thanks to the college’s existing digital strategy.

Since September 2017, the Plaistow college has been working with Google to train staff in G Suite for Education and roll it out across most of its programmes.

This has proven to be a lifeline during the ongoing coronavirus lockdown and provided continuity for learners in unprecedented circumstances. The online platform allows teachers to 
share interactive learning materials including videos, further reading and quizzes; provide consistent, timely and tailored feedback on students’ progress; and present live interactive lessons.

You may also want to watch:

Students are expected to attend live group sessions but can complete other work in their own time.

NewVIc says studying whenever suits them best is resulting in greater focus, attention and understanding of learning aims, whilst students are also becoming more self-motivated and accountable. Year 2 A-level student Nadia Monnan said: “Online learning is efficient as I’m learning and doing my work in my own comfort.

“I am enjoying it more than I thought I would.”

The college says that by offering more interesting and interactive ways to digest information, students are more engaged in the learning process and more interested in growing their knowledge base. A-level sociology teacher and OLEVI facilitator Sarah Butler said: “Being able to hear their teacher’s voice whilst completing memory recall activities, viewing and commenting on each other’s contributions, and taking part 
in whole-class discussions is proving incredibly effective for students. I recently delivered a mini live lecture which saw greater engagement from students than it usually would in a classroom.

“Students are more confident to ask questions using comments whilst I am presenting. It is also less disruptive and means I can look back to make sure I haven’t missed anyone.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Newham Recorder. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Newham Recorder