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Forest Gate pupils make horror film at West Ham FC

PUBLISHED: 15:55 18 February 2012

Budding photographer Tasneem Uddin captures Anu Rai & Hocine Boudeoudou with her camera

Budding photographer Tasneem Uddin captures Anu Rai & Hocine Boudeoudou with her camera

Archant

Budding filmmakers from a primary school in Forest Gate were awarded a £5,000 lottery grant to make their own horror film in the grounds of West Ham United Football Club.

A group of 16 pupils from Sandringham Primary School in Sandringham Road travelled to West Ham United’s Boleyn ground to shoot a comic horror film set in the 1960s.

The film, created entirely by the eight to 11 year olds, was a mixture of drama and stop frame animation.

The pupils were involved with every aspect of the production process from drawing storyboards and writing the scripts to lighting the films alongside industry professionals.

West Ham United inspire co-ordinated the programme, allowing the children to film in their Upton Park grounds.

Some of the pupils were part of a group which watches and reviews films but none had worked with professionals before.

The older pupils, who had a greater knowledge of filmmaking, led the projects and helped the younger students with their jobs to encourage communication across year groups.

First Light, an organisation providing opportunities for young people in digital media, organised the trip and distributes £1.1 million a year nationally through the British Film Institute each year as part of the “Young Film Fund.”

First Light CEO, Leigh Thomas, was impressed by the quality of the students’ latest film ideas.

He said: “First Light gives young people, from all over the UK, the opportunity to tell their stories on film.

“The fantastic ideas we receive are grown from the young filmmakers own imagination and innovation and tackle some very important issues relevant to them.”

Based in Birmingham, the organisation encourages young people from all background to develop their filmmaking skills, talent and creativity, emphasising the need for pupils from low income families and ethnic minority groups to use film as a way of expressing themselves, improve their language skills and boost self confidence.


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