East London football teams raise cash for players with mental issues

The East Living Football Club will benefit from the funds raised by the tournament

The East Living Football Club will benefit from the funds raised by the tournament - Credit: Archant

A football tournament has helped raise more than £650 for a team of players with mental health needs.

Twelve teams took part in the event which was organised by East Thames and the City of London at Wanstead Flats recently. They included two teams from the East Living Football Club, several staff teams from East Thames and a number of teams from the Charlton South London 7-a-side league, which was created specifically for teams with mental health needs.

The final was between Focus E15, a team of staff from one of East Thames’ foyers in Stratford, and You’ll Never Beat Des Walker, another of the staff teams. The latter clinched it and won a trophy donated by Trophyland. All the teams raised funds for the tournament, generating £393 between them. East Thames Group had promised to match the funds raised by the winning team (£262), bringing the total to £655.

All the funds will go towards the running of the East Living Football Club, which is open to east London residents with a mental health diagnosis.

Marc Paevie, team coach, who helped organise the tournament said: “I would like to thank all those who helped orchestrate, donated, participated and supported in the East Living Football tournament. We’re really happy with the money raised and with how many people got involved. The funds will help us pay for essentials such as kit and transport, without which the football club couldn’t function.”


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East Thames Group is a housing association and social regeneration charity.

The East Living Football Club is a small football club run by East Thames. When it was set up in 2009, it was aimed at East Thames residents but has proven so popular that it is now open to all east London residents with a mental health diagnosis. It aims to challenge the stigma of mental illness.

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