Growing number of cadets took part in Remembrance Sunday services across Newham

The wreath laying was a somber occasion Picture: Andrew Baker

The wreath laying was a somber occasion Picture: Andrew Baker - Credit: Archant

This year’s march to the Cenotaph in Central Park on Remembrance Sunday saw a huge number of young cadets taking part, making it the longest it has ever been.

Col Sgt Scott Farrar led the army cadets in the Remembrance Day parade in East Ham

Col Sgt Scott Farrar led the army cadets in the Remembrance Day parade in East Ham - Credit: Archant

Among them were scouts, members of the Air Training Corps, two units of the army cadets, the sea cadets and the police volunteer cadets. All marched smartly and stood side by side with war veterans who have served their country in many conflicts across the world.

Col Sgt Scott Farrar, said all the army cadets, represented by 46 detachment of the Rifles and 43 detachment from the Royal Horse Artillery, are expected to attend Remembrance Day services.

He said: “They learn the history of the event and the know that in years past there were young men of their age going to war.

“It is a big deal for them and they know that there were young men, aged 16 to their 20s, who went to fight and died and that it could have been them.”


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Flt Lt Chris Booty, from 282 Squadron East ham, said a lot of the cadets in the squadron had family members who had fought in the two World Wars.

“They want to come and take part and it is quite a sentimental event for them. They are also very proud to be part of the event.”

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Bob Stokes from the Royal British Legion, which organised the parade, said the borough had a strong link with World War I. It had also received five VCs, including one for the boy soldier “Jack” Cornwell who died on June 2 1916 after sustaining serious injuries in the Battle of Jutland. Jack, from Manor Park, enlisted with the Royal Navy aged just 15.

Allan White, 82, an RAF veteran from World War Two, said: “It is the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War and that has generated a tremendous amount of public interest.”

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